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At my book club’s April meeting I presented three books for the group to choose from and the overwhelming vote was for Someone by Alice McDermott – because it is quite short! However, I was pleased with the choice as this is a novel I’ve contemplated reading for quite a while now and Sunday over at Ciao Domenica had nothing but praise for it which piqued my interest even more.

This is one of those books that is more of a character study than anything – there really isn’t a traditional plot arc that holds it all together. In fact, the narrative moves in out and between the present and the past with no discernible transitions so it takes about 20 pages to realize what McDermott is doing and to become comfortable with the structure. Once you do, though, it’s quite easy to ride the wave of the main character’s memories.

The novel is told in the first person by Marie Commeford, an elderly woman who grew up in Brooklyn during the thirties and forties. Most of her memories center on the years of her childhood and young adulthood. Her family is Irish Catholic and live in a predominately Irish Catholic neighborhood and she is close to her beloved father and older brother who’s already been chosen to attend seminary at a young age. Most of her memories have that tender, almost yearning quality that we have as adults looking back on our childhoods. There is a lot of death and a lot of disappointment in her life, but she tells her story very straightforwardly with little regret. As I’ve mentioned, there isn’t a lot that happens in the novel yet Marie’s unexceptional story is riveting, more riveting to me than that of a spy story or an adventure story. Reading about ordinary people is always fascinating because most of us are ordinary – yet when you read something like this you realize that everyone has an interesting life and that, truly, everyone is ‘someone’.

How did my book club like it? Well, I think the majority of us appreciated it, but there were two members who didn’t – they didn’t see the point of the meandering style and just didn’t enjoy reading about Marie’s life. Despite that we all managed to have a pretty lively discussion about the book and I think it really set off a lot of related examination of our own memories and life stories. All in all, I’d recommend this for book clubs as it is a) short and b) brings up a lot of issues that will lead to a thoughtful discussion.

Have you read Alice McDermott?

6 Comments

  1. I haven’t read Alice McDermott yet. Borrowed this one from the library in Florida last winter, but wasn’t in the mood for a character study at the time. The writing was beautiful (judging from the first chapter, anyway) and I plan to try again in the fall.

    • Yes, you do have to be in the mood for a rather plot free book, but it is fantastic if you are in the mood for such lovely writing and vivid characters.

  2. I have never heard of Alice McDermott but I see our library has Someone on the shelves so look forward to reading it. It sounds rather like Academy Street by Mary Costello which I read earlier this year and loved.

  3. I haven’t read her books in a while, but I will be looking for this one. I really love Charming Billy. And At Wedding and Wakes is also a great book.

    • I’d definitely like to read more of her books. I love reading about the Irish Catholic community. How are you by the way? Any flooding in your area?

Thank you for reading and commenting.

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